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Evidence Law is a book that belonged to Lana Skye. The book lists the two rules to be followed when presenting evidence during a trial. Its cover has a yellow chick wearing a deerstalker hat while sitting at a desk and smoking a pipe.

The rules[]

Rule 1: No evidence shall be shown without the approval of the Police Department.
Rule 2: Unregistered evidence presented must be relevant to the case in trial.

As far as Phoenix Wright's experiences with these rules go, the only time in which they seemed to actually matter was during the trial of Lana Skye, when he received the book from Lana herself and used it to trap Damon Gant into implicating himself without implicating Lana's younger sister Ema. The first rule especially seems not to have been enforced in any of Wright's other trials, but it is possible that the police department quietly approved Wright's evidence at the time of presenting, as Police Chief Gant technically did during Lana's trial.

Another possible interpretation of the rules is that evidence must be approved by the police department, or, only if not approved, must be relevant to the case in trial, in which case it may be presented regardless; if this is taken as true, the second rule would override the requirement of the first rule in most cases. However, this seems to conflict with Miles Edgeworth's reasoning used when he rejects the blood found on the Victim's Shoe, that being that the police department had not approved the forensic evidence, after its relevance to the case had already been clearly shown. Since Angel Starr immediately rejected that argument by explaining that the evidence was, in fact approved, it is possible that she had just decided to make both the more irrefutable argument and the one that directly responded to Edgeworth's claim. The second rule of evidence as given by Edgeworth later during that trial day does differ slightly from its counterpart in the Evidence Law book, being "Rule 2: New evidence may only be submitted if it concerns the case on trial."

Role in Goodman murder trial[]

Main article: Rise from the Ashes

On the final trial day in Lana's trial for the murder of Bruce Goodman, Wright received the book during the first recess of the day from Dick Gumshoe. He found that Lana had hidden a picture in the back cover of the book, showing Marshall impaled on a suit of armor. Wright used the rules written inside to carry out a plan to present the strip of cloth that had been cut out of Neil Marshall's vest around the time he was murdered as the final victim of the SL-9 Incident. He intentionally refused to present it during the trial, knowing that doing so would only implicate Ema for Marshall's murder, as her handprint was on it.

Wright eventually presented Lana's picture showing that a piece of cloth had been torn out of Marshall's vest. He then presented the cloth, and Gant admitted that he had torn it out. However, Wright pointed out that, since the cloth had no blood on it, the order of events must have been that Ema had pushed Marshall, then Gant had torn out the cloth, then Marshall had been stabbed with the suit of armor. Gant accused Wright of submitting illegal evidence, claiming that his refusal to present it earlier had invalidated its legality, but Wright responded that he had presented the cloth only when he could satisfy both requirements laid out in the Evidence Law book.

Notes[]

  • The chick's deerstalker and pipe are objects strongly associated with stereotypical detectives in general, and Sherlock Holmes in particular.
  • The back cover of the book has another chick on it wearing a mortarboard, holding a stack of books, and welding a pointer of some sort, indicating that it is meant as an educational book. The text underneath the picture reads "© piyo". This indicates that the book may have been created and/or published by a company called "piyo". Indeed, at the end of Rise from the Ashes a book on forensic investigation is briefly shown that seems to be made by the same individuals, with the deerstalker-wearing chick on the cover using a magnifying glass to examine something, with a fingerprinting set beside it.
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